Bouncing Bambi, Cabin Fever, & Magical Cats

I couldn’t read at all for a while. I cleaned closets and drawers, cooked batches of meals to fill the freezer, learned how to brew my own flavor extracts, planted an indoor herb garden, made doughnuts and bread until I ran out of yeast, composed some music, and watched movies on TV, and though all of it filled the time and some of it was even productive, I needed more. I needed to escape the tension of being cooped up because of the pandemic. One day, several weeks down the road into madness, I glanced out the window and saw a deer placidly eating her breakfast in the tall grass, paying little attention to her fawn, which was leaping and bouncing and doing comical arabesques all around her. Happiness. Peacefulness.


(Image by smarko on Pixabay)

“Bambi,” I thought. “I need Bambi,” and that’s when I remembered the book I’d borrowed just before the library had closed due to the pandemic. It was a fantasy for grownups. I opened and started reading “The Catswold Portal” by Shirley Rousseau Murphy, but I did it slowly, a half chapter at a time, wanting to remain in the book’s world as long as possible. Continue reading

Reading Away a Virus

As the coronavirus spreads throughout our world, people are staying home, sometimes by choice, sometimes not. My own state is currently “on lockdown,” and many people are quickly running out of things to keep them busy. We readers, however, can travel to faraway places, joining interesting people (and animals) by simply picking up a book.

Those of us who own e-readers are truly in luck. We don’t have to go to a bookstore, and we don’t have to go to the library, both of which are probably closed anyway. However, we can go to our library electronically, downloading books for free. Continue reading

Cages for Books and Seagulls

The library catalog said the Rita Mae Brown book (“Sneaky Pie” mystery) was on the shelf, but not as far as I could see, so I complained to the librarian, thinking it must have been improperly shelved.

“I’m sure it’s here,” she said. “Did you look in the mystery section?”

“What mystery section?”

She pointed. “We’ve put all mysteries along the far wall.”


                                                                        image by mohamed_hassan on Pixabay.com

I found the book, but I was disturbed by the incarceration of mysteries. I started wandering and noticed they’d also captured and caged romances. It’s where I found “Gone with the Wind.” Like so many novels, there’s a strong love story in it, but what about the war that drives the entire plot? (Yes, I complained to the librarian.) Continue reading

Buried in Novels? Donate Them!

It’s usually a rare novel we plan to reread, but what about all the others jammed into the shelves? As enjoyable as they might have been, they’re now merely a home to dust mites and spiders. Why not dust those books one last time and then make someone happy with them?


(Image by Yerson Retamal on Pixabay)
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DIY Book-Style Kindle Case

A reason often cited for making your own Kindle cover is cost, but some truly nice covers are under $20. The real reason for doing it is that you love working with your hands, love the feeling of creating something all by yourself. Me too.

My favorite Kindle cover style opens and is held like a book, which leads to making a cover using a real book. The method is quite common, and whoever thought of it first has an ingenuity gene. Here are two links so you can see the basic concept:
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The Fur Person

The Fur Person by May Sarton

“A Fur Person is a cat who had decided to stay with people as long as he lives. This can only happen if a human being has imagined a part of himself into a cat just as the cat has imagined part of himself into a human being.”

Sarton’s own cat is the model for this delightful novella in which she imagines his journey from stray to gentleman cat. It’s a short and utterly charming read, complete with how the cat sees his world and sings to it.